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Sick or Dying Rose Hair?

Casey K.

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Thanks, I just refilled her dish and let the water overflow. I'll mist the surrounding area but not her.

If she still has issues removing any part of her exoskeleton, take a q-tip and wet it (soak it) and gently go around the areas where the exoskeloton appears to be sticking but try not to stress the spider out too much by doing this. Usually, they pop the carapace first when they start to molt but it's not unusual for tarantulas to get stuck in their molt with dry conditions (atmosphere). The liquid thats trapped between the old exoskeleton and new exoskeleton that helps during the removal of the old exoskeleton will dry out quicker if there isn't enough humidity. Also, environmental factors can stress the tarantula out during a molt and cause it to get stuck. This happens because the tarantula may be worried/focused on the things disturbing/stressing it and won't continue its cycle.
 

meiryrodriguez

New Member
If she still has issues removing any part of her exoskeleton, take a q-tip and wet it (soak it) and gently go around the areas where the exoskeloton appears to be sticking but try not to stress the spider out too much by doing this. Usually, they pop the carapace first when they start to molt but it's not unusual for tarantulas to get stuck in their molt with dry conditions (atmosphere). The liquid thats trapped between the old exoskeleton and new exoskeleton that helps during the removal of the old exoskeleton will dry out quicker if there isn't enough humidity. Also, environmental factors can stress the tarantula out during a molt and cause it to get stuck. This happens because the tarantula may be worried/focused on the things disturbing/stressing it and won't continue its cycle.
Yeah, she seemed off before the molt. She quit eating (which I know is normal) but her abdomen shrunk, which has never happened before. She was spending a lot of time in her water dish, and she didn't lay down ground webbing or flip onto her back.

I'm not sure why it would be less humid now than in any of her prior molts? Ah well, I really hope this works itself out. I don't think she will respond well to me trying to remove it, and I'm a bit squeamish! I've had her forever, but she's always been so low maintenance. Thanks for your help!
 

Casey K.

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Yeah, she seemed off before the molt. She quit eating (which I know is normal) but her abdomen shrunk, which has never happened before. She was spending a lot of time in her water dish, and she didn't lay down ground webbing or flip onto her back.

I'm not sure why it would be less humid now than in any of her prior molts? Ah well, I really hope this works itself out. I don't think she will respond well to me trying to remove it, and I'm a bit squeamish! I've had her forever, but she's always been so low maintenance. Thanks for your help!

You're welcome! Please keep us updated! :) Also, if you could upload some pics here that would be great!
 

Casey K.

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If your tarantula is in premolt....at the first sign of premolt (so as not to stress the tarantula during the actual molting process) you should always make sure their substrate is damp and overflow their water dish. Even desert species require some form of humidity to make the removal of their exoskeleton easier. It makes sense scientifically. Desert species build burrows under rocks and other plants, etc. They are deep underground where the soil has soaked up rain. I'm sure they don't wait until the highest temp of the day to go out in the sun and lay on their backs to molt. They molt underground where they are safe and there is an adequate amount of humidity. I would remove the forest floor completely. Offer a soft substrate that is mixed with sand and peat moss to retain moisture. It's not gonna hurt the tarantula. Even my desert species live on substrate that is slightly damp at all times. I've never had an issue. Offer a reservoir and overflow it once a week. For a hide I would use a piece of cork bark. Make sure your substrate is at least 4" deep because they do like to burrow. Dig a small hole under the cork bark after you place it directly on top of the soil. The tarantula may then finish it's burrow where you started it. You're good to go. :)
 

Oursapoil

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It looks like the cephalothorax shell is popping out. I can't help but thinking, if the humidity is high enough in the tank, that it might be worth it to gently remove it using tweezers. I had successes this way but it doesn't mean that this is a recommended method or that it would be successful here. In my case I was dealing with younger Ts that seemed to be in decent health. Crossing my fingers she gets out of it on her own and lives many more years with you. (The wood has to go ;) )
 

meiryrodriguez

New Member
It looks like the cephalothorax shell is popping out. I can't help but thinking, if the humidity is high enough in the tank, that it might be worth it to gently remove it using tweezers. I had successes this way but it doesn't mean that this is a recommended method or that it would be successful here. In my case I was dealing with younger Ts that seemed to be in decent health. Crossing my fingers she gets out of it on her own and lives many more years with you. (The wood has to go ;) )
If she survives I'll definitely make the recommended changes to her enclosure, but I can't imagine it would be advisable to do right now.
 

Casey K.

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If she survives I'll definitely make the recommended changes to her enclosure, but I can't imagine it would be advisable to do right now.

Now that she has turned upright you can mist the top of her (her booklungs are no longer exposed). Mist her and gently remove the remainder of her exoskeleton on her carapace and abdomen. Be very careful when removing these. Especially on the abdomen because a tear can be fatal as it is more fragile than the carapace.
 

meiryrodriguez

New Member
Now that she has turned upright you can mist the top of her (her booklungs are no longer exposed). Mist her and gently remove the remainder of her exoskeleton on her carapace and abdomen. Be very careful when removing these. Especially on the abdomen because a tear can be fatal as it is more fragile than the carapace.
I tried but she crawled under her log. The carapace definitely seems to still be affixed to her midsection and I don't know how much pressure is safe to apply. Do you think I should persist, or should I just leave her be? I went ahead and misted the whole enclosure some more so hopeful the humidity is up.
 

Casey K.

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I tried but she crawled under her log. The carapace definitely seems to still be affixed to her midsection and I don't know how much pressure is safe to apply. Do you think I should persist, or should I just leave her be? I went ahead and misted the whole enclosure some more so hopeful the humidity is up.

Directly spray the area where the carapace is attached. How about the exoskeleton on the abdomen? Has it detached?
 

Arachnoclown

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A little insight on humidity and molting. Air humidity/heat does nothing to help a tarantulas molt. A spider uses moisture from within to molt. Pumping it between the new and old exoskeletons. Moist substate however will help from unnecessarily losing moisture.
But this has got to be her 4th or 5th molt using the same substrate.
Its a sensitizer....the more you are exposed thats when thing start happening.
Screenshot_20200813-112208_Chrome.jpg
 

Casey K.

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A little insight on humidity and molting. Air humidity/heat does nothing to help a tarantulas molt. A spider uses moisture from within to molt. Pumping it between the new and old exoskeletons. Moist substate however will help.

Its a sensitizer....the more you are exposed thats when thing start happening.View attachment 48480

I agree with you but what makes a tarantula get stuck in a molt in dry conditions if they secrete that fluid between exoskeletons? Then it wouldn't matter what type of environment they molt in. It does make sense for them to retain that fluid but sometimes that fluid alone is not enough? Could you see a tarantula molting better in dry heat or humid heat? See what I'm getting at.... :)
 

Arachnoclown

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Yeah, she seemed off before the molt. She quit eating (which I know is normal) but her abdomen shrunk, which has never happened before. She was spending a lot of time in her water dish, and she didn't lay down ground webbing or flip onto her back.

I'm not sure why it would be less humid now than in any of her prior molts? Ah well, I really hope this works itself out. I don't think she will respond well to me trying to remove it, and I'm a bit squeamish! I've had her forever, but she's always been so low maintenance. Thanks for your help!
I'm suprised she didn't flip and molt in her dish.
I agree with you but what makes a tarantula get stuck in a molt in dry conditions if they secrete that fluid between exoskeletons? Then it wouldn't matter what type of environment they molt in. It does make sense for them to retain that fluid but sometimes that fluid alone is not enough? Could you see a tarantula molting better in dry heat or humid heat? See what I'm getting at.... :)
She didn't flip so the fluid was wasted. She didn't feel comfortable anywhere...her senses are out of wack. If her senses weren't altered I'd bet she would have flipped in the water dish. Hard to say...so much unknown in the mind of a spider.
 

Casey K.

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I'm suprised she didn't flip and molt in her dish.

She didn't flip so the fluid was wasted. She didn't feel comfortable anywhere...her senses are out of wack. If her senses weren't altered I'd bet she would have flipped in the water dish. Hard to say...so much unknown in the mind of a spider.

True true....
 

meiryrodriguez

New Member
Hopefully this will be my last update!

She was still stuck this morning, but I misted her some more and was able to take of the carapace and most of the abdomen molt relatively easily with a wet q-tip and tweezers. It looks like there might still be a strip of abdomen on one side, but it doesn't seem to be in her way so I'm just going to leave it. She seems to be returning to her normal stance and behavior.

Thanks for all your help and suggestions. This couldn't have come at a worse time because we are packing up and moving in a couple days, so I expect she will be stressed out even more. Once we move, and she has regained her strength and had time to settle, I'll update her tank with the new substrate.
 

Casey K.

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3 Year Member
Tarantula Club Member
Hopefully this will be my last update!

She was still stuck this morning, but I misted her some more and was able to take of the carapace and most of the abdomen molt relatively easily with a wet q-tip and tweezers. It looks like there might still be a strip of abdomen on one side, but it doesn't seem to be in her way so I'm just going to leave it. She seems to be returning to her normal stance and behavior.

Thanks for all your help and suggestions. This couldn't have come at a worse time because we are packing up and moving in a couple days, so I expect she will be stressed out even more. Once we move, and she has regained her strength and had time to settle, I'll update her tank with the new substrate.

Awesome job! :) Congratulations on successfully helping her out! I am glad she is doing well. Definitely change the substrate out. I would offer a piece of cork bark and start her a burrow, too. Next time she molts she will remove the excess exoskeleton that's still stuck on her abdomen so it shouldn't be an issue.
 
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