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Missing hair and Id needed.

Tigerhawk

New Member
I’m new to Tarantula keeping. Someone gave me a tarantula that they could no longer keep along with it’s cage and water bowl with a sponge. Of course I threw the sponge and everything that came with it. I have set it up following the research I have done on this forum and and other sources. So I have a question I was told it is a curly haired T. I have also included a picture of it so that hopefully someone can give me a positive Id. Also if you look at it abdomen near it’s rear end. You will see that it’s missing a patch of hair. What causes this, and how can this be corrected? By the way it was like that when I received it. Thanks in advance for your help.
 

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WolfSpider

Well-Known Member
3 Year Member
It is a curly hair indeed. And a beautiful Honduran version (extra special). The loss of hair is called an urt patch. It is normal as the tarantula ages its exoskeleton. One day your tarantula will molt and the bald patch will be gone. Oh, and congratulations!
 

Oursapoil

Well-Known Member
Tarantula Club Member
Hello friend,
Congratulations on rescuing this lovely T. 99% sure this is a Tliltocatl albopilosus (ex Brachypelma). The bald spot is due to hair flicking (setae) which is a defensive mechanism and totally normal. It should be flesh colored, once it starts darkening it means your T is in pre-molt. Hope this helps.
Cheers.
 

Oursapoil

Well-Known Member
Tarantula Club Member
It is a curly hair indeed. And a beautiful Honduran version (extra special). The loss of hair is called an urt patch. It is normal as the tarantula ages its exoskeleton. One day your tarantula will molt and the bald patch will be gone. Oh, and congratulations!
Great minds think alike :)
Happy I learnt something new today, thanks to you, as I had no idea the bold patch had a name. Just told Enzo and got a “Duh!” In response.... ;)
 

Oursapoil

Well-Known Member
Tarantula Club Member
Only thing I will add is that Albopilosus has 3 localities and this is from Nicaragua not Honduras as previously mentioned
Hi,
As this is a great learning opportunity, would you mind to let us know how to differentiate individuals from the 3 different origins?
We have 4 of these boggers of different sizes which came from 4 different breeders and I would love to be able to tell which one is which :)
That would be greatly appreciated if you have a few minutes.
Cheers.
 

Rs50matt

Well-Known Member
1,000+ Post Club
No problem. The difference between Honduran and Nicaraguan is easy to spot. The one pictured in the op is a Nicaraguan. The one below is a Honduran
57CB93DC-9F1E-44E7-AD71-482DB97058B0.jpeg

It looks more like an LP than an Albo.
The 3rd locality is Ometepe Island. I’ve never seen an adult myself so if anyone who has a picture can post it would be appreciated. I believe it is very similar to the Nicaraguan but has a hint of blue on the femurs.
 

Oursapoil

Well-Known Member
Tarantula Club Member
No problem. The difference between Honduran and Nicaraguan is easy to spot. The one pictured in the op is a Nicaraguan. The one below is a Honduran View attachment 53531
It looks more like an LP than an Albo.
The 3rd locality is Ometepe Island. I’ve never seen an adult myself so if anyone who has a picture can post it would be appreciated. I believe it is very similar to the Nicaraguan but has a hint of blue on the femurs.
Greatly appreciated, thank you.
 

octanejunkie

Well-Known Member
1,000+ Post Club
3 Year Member
Tarantula Club Member
Ometepe is an island in southwest Nicaragua’s vast Lake Nicaragua. It's known for its twin volcanoes. The active Concepción Volcano is in the island’s north. South, trails lead up Maderas Volcano to San Ramón Waterfall.

The ometepe variation of T albopilosus, pictured below, is described as having a blue hue to the legs. There are a few references to the sp in various places online.

Only adult pic I could find, no distinct blue hue tho
43312076_503443163491148_8353652121551520283_n-1.jpg


Here's a discussion on it

To the OP, nice looking T
 

Tigerhawk

New Member
Thanks everyone for your help. I’m glad to hear that my T will be okay. I’m a little concerned that this will not be my only T. I’m a reptile guy, however I find myself researching the care requirements for other Ts now. I think I’m slowly getting into trouble hear.
 

WolfSpider

Well-Known Member
3 Year Member
Duh. My bad. I know the difference. I just got the two localities mixed up. Getting old...one of you may have to wipe my butt in a few years or spoon feed me applesauce.....
 

Gizalba

Well-Known Member
Thank you so much for rescuing this T and getting rid of the sponge :) Sounds like he is safe hands.

And thanks for the info on how to tell the difference between the three types of T. albos. I have a few Nicaraguan ones, one Ometepe Island. However the latter is still a baby so I will have to wait to see about the blue tinged femurs.
 

Wolfclans

Active Member
I’m new to Tarantula keeping. Someone gave me a tarantula that they could no longer keep along with it’s cage and water bowl with a sponge. Of course I threw the sponge and everything that came with it. I have set it up following the research I have done on this forum and and other sources. So I have a question I was told it is a curly haired T. I have also included a picture of it so that hopefully someone can give me a positive Id. Also if you look at it abdomen near it’s rear end. You will see that it’s missing a patch of hair. What causes this, and how can this be corrected? By the way it was like that when I received it. Thanks in advance for your help.
That's a curly hair I have two of them
 

Wolfclans

Active Member
It is a curly hair indeed. And a beautiful Honduran version (extra special). The loss of hair is called an urt patch. It is normal as the tarantula ages its exoskeleton. One day your tarantula will molt and the bald patch will be gone. Oh, and congratulations!
This is my curly hair juvenile
 

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Tigerhawk

New Member
Thanks everyone for your help with my new T. I believe I will more than likely have more of them in the future. I had no idea there were so many different types and colors of T’s.
 

Wolfclans

Active Member
Thanks everyone for your help with my new T. I believe I will more than likely have more of them in the future. I had no idea there were so many different types and colors of T’s.
 

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