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HELP. WTH!! Freaky death.

I was given a hat hati a couple of weeks ago. It was eating fine a few days ago but when I came to rehouse it today I found it dead. But not in the usual way. It has completely wrapped itself in it's own webbing. Its four hind legs curled under in a death curl and its front four in an attack stance. It's not the moult. I'm not a newbie. I'm at a loss as to why and how it managed to do this...
 

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Enn49

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I'm sorry I can't help but I will be interested to see if anyone can come up with a solution for you. Definitely a weird one :rolleyes:
 

Enn49

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Did it burrow. Could it’s burrow have collapsed and it got trapped in the thick tunnel webbing? That is super weird
Normally if their burrow collapses they can dig their way out.
 

AndrewClayton

Well-Known Member
It looks like another spider has wrapped it in web this would be practically impossible for a T to do to itself it’s wrapped around too tight to have just stuck to the spider if the burrow collapsed
 

AndrewClayton

Well-Known Member
No another T definitely didn't web it. Its burrow was completely in tact. It was lying in its burrow like this when I found it. Tub still sealed.
Sorry bud I never meant another T just a spider, you’re T could have died and another spider has took advantage. The way the T is wraped in the web it obviously never done it to itself
 

Jess S

Well-Known Member
I understand how everyone thought it was web though. That's exactly how it looks in the photo! Anyone know what sort of mould looks like that?
 

Stan Schultz

New Member
I understand how everyone thought it was web though. That's exactly how it looks in the photo! Anyone know what sort of mould looks like that?
Potentially about 10,000 different species. A better question might be, "What kinds of fungi are known to infest terrestrial arthropods, living or dead?" That might narrow it down a bit.

Or you could send it to a competent mycologist who might culture it in an effort to get "fruiting bodies" (the various spore forming structures used by fungi for reproduction). Or do a DNA analysis of it.

How would you go about this? Google mycology arthropod parasite site:.edu. I got over 9,000 hits. Or contact a botanist at a local college or university for help in finding such a person.

For what it's worth, I have the unsubstantiated opinion that what you have there may be a type of ascomycete (there are more than 64,000 known kinds!), but don't quote me on that. It's far more wishful thinking than a scientific pronouncement. And, guessing it to be an ascomycete is laughably non-specific, about equivalent to saying that the thing that just ate your cat was some sort of vertebrate.

You can find out more about fungi (a.k.a., "mold") here.

Hope this helps.
 

Jess S

Well-Known Member
Potentially about 10,000 different species. A better question might be, "What kinds of fungi are known to infest terrestrial arthropods, living or dead?" That might narrow it down a bit.

Or you could send it to a competent mycologist who might culture it in an effort to get "fruiting bodies" (the various spore forming structures used by fungi for reproduction). Or do a DNA analysis of it.

How would you go about this? Google mycology arthropod parasite site:.edu. I got over 9,000 hits. Or contact a botanist at a local college or university for help in finding such a person.

For what it's worth, I have the unsubstantiated opinion that what you have there may be a type of ascomycete (there are more than 64,000 known kinds!), but don't quote me on that. It's far more wishful thinking than a scientific pronouncement. And, guessing it to be an ascomycete is laughably non-specific, about equivalent to saying that the thing that just ate your cat was some sort of vertebrate.

You can find out more about fungi (a.k.a., "mold") here.

Hope this helps.
Thanks Stan Schultz for that reply. I can now die happy!! Thanks for The Tarantula Keepers Guide, still going strong years later :)
 

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