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Help please. (small, not eating)

Discussion in 'General Tarantula Discussion' started by Zsazsalouise, Jan 12, 2019.

  1. Zsazsalouise

    Zsazsalouise New Member

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    Hi

    Im new to this forum. I just want some help or opinions. I have a chilean rose. I have had it for about 3/4 years however it is still tiny. Could it be a drawf species? We dont know the sex but we havent seen any hooks on the front legs. Also it hasnt eaten for a good few months at least and no sign of molting.

    Just a bit worried. As its first T.

    P. S the T is only in that box to show size easier

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  2. Nunua

    Nunua Well-Known Member

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    Welcome to the family!

    First of all, that's not tiny anymore but a beautiful juvenile.
    G. rosea is no dwarf species, it's just sloooooooow growing and very well known for having long fasting periods - Why? Just because they can :D Especially, if by "3/4 years" you mean ~9 months, it's totally normal that it hasn't molted in your care and you feel like it's not growing at all.

    Your T looks all fine and healthy, so no need to worry! Just have it in a dry enclosure, keep the water dish full of fresh water, and overflow the dish occasionally. That's all it needs :) It'll eat and/or molt when it feels like doing so.
    Last edited: Jan 13, 2019
  3. Zsazsalouise

    Zsazsalouise New Member

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    I do actually mean that it is 3-4 years old. Thats why i am worried
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  4. Nunua

    Nunua Well-Known Member

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    Well, still. Like I said, G. rosea is a slow growing species. Being 3-4 years old yours is a well developed and grown juvenile, so I'm sure that everything is absolutely fine - It also looks perfectly healthy and so no need to worry :)
    And no matter who you ask here from, they'll say that G. rosea have long fasting and/or premolt periods - Just keep the water dish full and it'll thrive.

    If tarantulas can teach you something, it's patience :D
    For example, I don't remember who it was, but his Brachypelma was buried and fasting something like over 140 days (>4.5 months) and was totally fine.
    Last edited: Jan 13, 2019
  5. Dave Jay

    Dave Jay Well-Known Member 1,000+ Post Club

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    I just checked my records, some of my smallest slings have had their burrows blocked since April 30 or May 11. Looking at the ones I can see through the sides they still have plump butts that look like they would pop, I know they were hiding from winter but this is ridiculous! (I live in Australia)
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  6. Phil

    Phil Well-Known Member 3 Year Member 1,000+ Post Club

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    as others have said, a healthy looking spider. It is ypical (if frustrating at times) behaviour for this species. Again, really good advice about freshwater and to keep dry etc.
    I see nothing at all to worry about. Lovely looking spider.
  7. RonC

    RonC Active Member

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    Slings eating more than once is a rumor :). At least that's how it seems to new keepers. I've been keeping a little over three months. Out of 5 slings two have eaten once in my care and burrowed. The largest one, a whopping 2 inch G.pulchripes, eats whenever it get the opportunity. Another sneaks out at night and drags its pre-killed into its burrow. It did take a pinhead lat last feeding so were advancing. The other is so little I don't know if its eaten or not but the last p-k lat did change position in the enclosure overnight. Frustrating when our cold blooded pets don't seem to eat. I'm getting better about not worrying.
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  8. Kurk1921

    Kurk1921 Member

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    Opisthosoma ratio to prosoma looks fine and rather plump. I have had an M. balfouri fast for 6-7 months. Perfectly capable and hardy taxon.
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