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Handling Mr T?

Discussion in 'General Tarantula Discussion' started by Bubbles, Sep 30, 2018.

  1. Bubbles

    Bubbles Member

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    Dear all I was wondering what the main thoughts are on handling your T?
    Do or don't? And any tips?.
    Bubbles. o_O
  2. Enn49

    Enn49 Moderator Staff Member Premium Member 3 Year Member 1,000+ Post Club

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    Many of us don't handle our Ts as they can be stressed by it. There is also the danger of them jumping or falling and injuring themselves or worse so if you do handle always make sure you do it either at floor level or over your bed/sofa.
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  3. Bubbles

    Bubbles Member

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    EveryThing's for that Every time we handle Bubbles we always do it over the bed, recently I went to a petting zoo and aT they had there was very dosile and calm (Chilean Rose) when handled. They would pick him up by putting there hand over him, I always try to walk Bubbles on to my hand and I didn't know weather this was the best way of doing it or not?
  4. Enn49

    Enn49 Moderator Staff Member Premium Member 3 Year Member 1,000+ Post Club

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    I think you're right at least it gives the T a choice and you can judge its mood too.
  5. Bubbles

    Bubbles Member

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    Thanks for that Enn glad to know I'm on the right path, would there be a best time to handle our T friend? currently Bubbles is 5 days since molting.
    Morning, evening, night, before eating, after eating?
  6. Enn49

    Enn49 Moderator Staff Member Premium Member 3 Year Member 1,000+ Post Club

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    Best to give her a week after a moult so she's hardened up and probably a few days after feeding, you don't want to handle a hungry T.
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  7. Bubbles

    Bubbles Member

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    I pitty da fool.!!:D
    Quoting Mr T (Ba Baracus):T:
  8. Bubbles

    Bubbles Member

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    All joking aside Enn, Thanks for your experiance and advice it has been appreciated.
    Bubbles
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  9. Arachnoclown

    Arachnoclown Well-Known Member Premium Member 1,000+ Post Club

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    I try to not hold my Ts unless they are in harm's way (trying to escape). I would highly reccomend not holding them in or on your bed.;)
    tumblr_nqfwikJoMX1upxwm8o1_r1_400.gif
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  10. MassExodus

    MassExodus Well-Known Member 3 Year Member 1,000+ Post Club

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    I think the main thing to worry about is feeding response. Once they're outside the enclosure, its safer. Ive handled multiple tarantulas. Only got bitten once though. Feeding response, 100%
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  11. MassExodus

    MassExodus Well-Known Member 3 Year Member 1,000+ Post Club

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    Yeah, dont "pinch grab" them. You're doing it right.
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  12. patricia

    patricia New Member 3 Year Member

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    Hey @Bubbles ! This is a great question and one that's kinda controversial. While many people agree that it's very dangerous and shouldn't be done, some believe that some species are docile enough to do this if you are well educated in the safety practices and tarantula behavior. I made a quick video about how to prepare yourself if you are thinking about handling a tarantula if it helps!
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  13. Rs50matt

    Rs50matt Well-Known Member

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    I don't think people say it's dangerous because of getting bitten. The reason it's considered dangerous is for the spider not us. There are people who don't handle any of their Ts who would easily name species that are docile enough to handle
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  14. patricia

    patricia New Member 3 Year Member

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    @Rs50matt that is such a good point! In many cases it is so much more dangerous for them! A good portion of T deaths are actually from their owners dropping them :(
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  15. bbbs53

    bbbs53 Member

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    I have been keeping these since 1990, I don't find it necessary to handle a creature that probably doesn't really like it. The spider I keep now, B. Boehmei, has urticating bristles that are quite irritating and she can flick them with her hind legs. A short fall will break them pronto and although in all of this time I haven't been bit, handling them increases the chance of it happening. Mine is a bit skittish and doesn't seem to desire contact with humans but is perfectly content in her enclosure. If you want to handle something I would get a puppy.
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  16. Arachnoclown

    Arachnoclown Well-Known Member Premium Member 1,000+ Post Club

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    Curious....do you even own a tarantula. I've watched a few of your videos and there is nothing in your videos but you....talking. I love watching videos to learn but your videos are not that appealing to the average person looking to see a spider or two. You could have demonstrated how to handle a spider...with a spider. Maybe it's just me.:beer:
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  17. Dave Jay

    Dave Jay Well-Known Member

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    I don't think there's many animals that do like to be handled to be honest, I can't see any reason for it. Even puppies and kittens don't like being carried around much, patted, scratched behind the ears, sleepy cuddles on your lap yeah, but not actually handled and carried around.
    I should look for the link, but a study done on Bearded Dragons showed that even if handled every day from hatching they still produce the "stress chemicals" when handled. Even though they sit quietly and don't try to escape their brains were still releasing the same chemicals it would were they being hunted. If I recall similar results were had on experiments with guinea pigs and rabbits. Experiments of that level haven't been done on inverts but the same situation could be happening with them.
    So personally I would avoid handling any animal unless absolutely necessary.
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  18. Rs50matt

    Rs50matt Well-Known Member

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    Fully agree. As soon as a creature is handled or picked up it removes their ability to do their own thing. I've had a lot of pets over the years from cats , dogs, rabbits , parakeet,owls, fish, tarantulas(more recently) bearded dragons. Etc. And can't think of any that would show signs of wanting to pick them up. Cats will happily lay on your lap but as soon as you try to pick them up will walk away and sleep somewhere else.

    I understand why people choose to handle their Ts but I also don't see why people can't hold themselves back from doing it.
  19. MassExodus

    MassExodus Well-Known Member 3 Year Member 1,000+ Post Club

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    I've always said, handling tarantulas is purely for the humans benefit, the spider certainly gets nothing from it. I also think if you've never handled one, you can't really argue about it...you have no idea what it feels like, to hold a suprisingly heavy adult tarantula, to feel its claws as it moves, its weight and presence. We have other senses for a reason. :) Just sayin. Arguing from a philisophical standpoint isn't quite the same. Live a little ;)
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  20. Bubbles

    Bubbles Member

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    Hey All
    Thanks for your input , and as Patricia's video states if you leave the decision up to them and try to observe there temperament and take it into consideration you will have a happy T and it will be safer for all Parties.

    Bubbles :T:
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