• Are you a Tarantula hobbyist? If so, we invite you to join our community! Once you join you'll be able to post messages, upload pictures of your pets and enclosures and chat with other Tarantula enthusiasts. Sign up today!

Chaco Golden knee hiding

Gurat

New Member
Hi guys, I'm a bit worried, because my T (chaco golden knee) got into ger hide on 31st December (New year's Eve) and hasn't got out since then. She is not even drinking. She stopped eating at around last September/October I think. She covered her entrance with web, as if she's saying I don't wanna be disturbed. But she's still alive because a few days ago, I broke her web and touched her feet a little bit with tweezers, and she moved inside her hide of course. What I'm getting concerned most about, is because she is not even drinking. Maybe she is hibernating? I have a heatmat under her enclosure as well. I also have a dehumidifier going on since last December, but her humidity level inside her enclosure is 62%, or at least that's what the meter says. I will attach some photos of the enclosure, and of her entrance as well. Is this a normal behaviour? Thanks in advance
 

Attachments

Rs50matt

Well-Known Member
I’d start but saying that Grammostola Pulchripes are awesome Ts to have and a very nice species.

Tarantulas live on instinct. If it’s too hot they will burrow. This is why heat mats are potentially very dangerous and can slowly cook and kill your spider so I would remove it straight away. They aren’t needed.

Humidity is also not important. Care sheets use lazy information and don’t take any factor into consideration other than location.

Best set up I would reccommend is simply a hide a water dish and enough substrate to burrow if it chooses to.

How big is it? Grammostola are a genus know for long premolt
 
E

ExMember

Guest
How big is the spider? I have 2. One is 5"+ and never even hides or digs. She's always out in the open. My other one is always in its burrow. That one is probably 1-2". They display a range of behaviors depending on size.

I have had tarantulas go 5 months without water (always supplied but no evidence of use). Also saw a 6 month fast by a tiny sling. Not saying you shouldn't attempt to feed or water but tarantulas have evolved to go on very little.

I would suggest ditching the heat mat. If it gets to low 60's F just heat the room. No reason for a hygrometer either. With very few exceptions it's irrelevant :) Some species need bone dry ( Chromatopelma cyaneopubescens and avicularia) and some need damp ( T stirmi, T blondi). Most others (Brachypelma, Grammastola etc) have no humidity requirements. My rule of thumb is if I am comfortable then the spiders are too :)
 

PanzoN88

Well-Known Member
1,000+ Post Club
3 Year Member
I’d start but saying that Grammostola Pulchripes are awesome Ts to have and a very nice species.

Tarantulas live on instinct. If it’s too hot they will burrow. This is why heat mats are potentially very dangerous and can slowly cook and kill your spider so I would remove it straight away. They aren’t needed.

Humidity is also not important. Care sheets use lazy information and don’t take any factor into consideration other than location.

Best set up I would reccommend is simply a hide a water dish and enough substrate to burrow if it chooses to.

How big is it? Grammostola are a genus know for long premolt
I will echo this statement, I will just add that the moisture in the substrate is important, but the humidity in the air is not. G. pulchripes like dry substrate and a water dish.
 

Jess S

Well-Known Member
1,000+ Post Club
Everyone has given spot on advice. Ditch the heat mat immediately or you could end up with a dead t.
Moulting tarantulas need to drink extra water, but a heat mat attracts them and they can sit by it for so long, that by the time they need to drink, they are too dehydrated to move to their water dish.
As you see evidence of movement you've probably caught it in time. With the heatmat gone and the burrow cooling down, your t should now be ok.
Keep a close eye and any concerns ask the forum.
 

Konstantin

Well-Known Member
Hi guys, I'm a bit worried, because my T (chaco golden knee) got into ger hide on 31st December (New year's Eve) and hasn't got out since then. She is not even drinking. She stopped eating at around last September/October I think. She covered her entrance with web, as if she's saying I don't wanna be disturbed. But she's still alive because a few days ago, I broke her web and touched her feet a little bit with tweezers, and she moved inside her hide of course. What I'm getting concerned most about, is because she is not even drinking. Maybe she is hibernating? I have a heatmat under her enclosure as well. I also have a dehumidifier going on since last December, but her humidity level inside her enclosure is 62%, or at least that's what the meter says. I will attach some photos of the enclosure, and of her entrance as well. Is this a normal behaviour? Thanks in advance
Hi
Its very likely she is coming for a drink when you not arround.She can tare the silk curtain drink and web again in less than 30 min and you will never know she been out.I cought my T.Albopilosus do that few days ago.
Regards Konstantin
 

Gurat

New Member
I’d start but saying that Grammostola Pulchripes are awesome Ts to have and a very nice species.

Tarantulas live on instinct. If it’s too hot they will burrow. This is why heat mats are potentially very dangerous and can slowly cook and kill your spider so I would remove it straight away. They aren’t needed.

Humidity is also not important. Care sheets use lazy information and don’t take any factor into consideration other than location.

Best set up I would reccommend is simply a hide a water dish and enough substrate to burrow if it chooses to.

How big is it? Grammostola are a genus know for long premolt
My T is about 1 year old. Heatmat unplugged now
 

Gurat

New Member
How big is the spider? I have 2. One is 5"+ and never even hides or digs. She's always out in the open. My other one is always in its burrow. That one is probably 1-2". They display a range of behaviors depending on size.

I have had tarantulas go 5 months without water (always supplied but no evidence of use). Also saw a 6 month fast by a tiny sling. Not saying you shouldn't attempt to feed or water but tarantulas have evolved to go on very little.

I would suggest ditching the heat mat. If it gets to low 60's F just heat the room. No reason for a hygrometer either. With very few exceptions it's irrelevant :) Some species need bone dry ( Chromatopelma cyaneopubescens and avicularia) and some need damp ( T stirmi, T blondi). Most others (Brachypelma, Grammastola etc) have no humidity requirements. My rule of thumb is if I am comfortable then the spiders are too :)
My T is about 1 year old, and tye heatmat has been unplugged
 

Gurat

New Member
Everyone has given spot on advice. Ditch the heat mat immediately or you could end up with a dead t.
Moulting tarantulas need to drink extra water, but a heat mat attracts them and they can sit by it for so long, that by the time they need to drink, they are too dehydrated to move to their water dish.
As you see evidence of movement you've probably caught it in time. With the heatmat gone and the burrow cooling down, your t should now be ok.
Keep a close eye and any concerns ask the forum.
Yes the heatmat is now gone, the temperature dropped to 19 degrees celcius (with heatmeat it was 21 as in the photo indicated) but still no sign of movement
 

Jess S

Well-Known Member
1,000+ Post Club
Yes the heatmat is now gone, the temperature dropped to 19 degrees celcius (with heatmeat it was 21 as in the photo indicated) but still no sign of movement
Trouble is I've got no way of knowing how accurate your temp guage is or what the temperature reaches inside that burrow seeing as the mat was positioned underneath, which is strongly advised against. 19 Deg C isn't too low a temperature anyway.
 

Gurat

New Member
Trouble is I've got no way of knowing how accurate your temp guage is or what the temperature reaches inside that burrow seeing as the mat was positioned underneath, which is strongly advised against. 19 Deg C isn't too low a temperature anyway.
Shall I try to dig her out, or it's better if I don't? To be honest, I touched her leg a bit with the tweezers, at first she didn't move, but then she turned and faced the tweezers
 

Jess S

Well-Known Member
1,000+ Post Club
Shall I try to dig her out, or it's better if I don't? To be honest, I touched her leg a bit with the tweezers, at first she didn't move, but then she turned and faced the tweezers
Then she's fine! Rest assured she will come out when she's ready and I'm sure you have a nice full water dish ready and waiting for when she wants it.
 

Gurat

New Member
Then she's fine! Rest assured she will come out when she's ready and I'm sure you have a nice full water dish ready and waiting for when she wants it.
Yes, water dish always full for when she decides to stop the quarantine but thanks for the info
 

menavodi

Well-Known Member
1,000+ Post Club
3 Year Member
Tarantula Club Member
Shall I try to dig her out, or it's better if I don't? To be honest, I touched her leg a bit with the tweezers, at first she didn't move, but then she turned and faced the tweezers
Just leave her alone. As you said: she moved. She is fine...nothing to worry about. I think the heatmat did not do any harm, since you had it on for a year. 19°C is ok and so is 22°C...
 

Jess S

Well-Known Member
1,000+ Post Club
Just leave her alone. As you said: she moved. She is fine...nothing to worry about. I think the heatmat did not do any harm, since you had it on for a year. 19°C is ok and so is 22°C...
Agreed. He had the heatmat for a year?! I missed that bit of info.. :)
 

Gurat

New Member
Just leave her alone. As you said: she moved. She is fine...nothing to worry about. I think the heatmat did not do any harm, since you had it on for a year. 19°C is ok and so is 22°C...
Ok I will leave it then, but the heatmat was not for a year. About 5 months I think
 
Top