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Burrowed sling

Discussion in 'Grammostola' started by RonC, Nov 11, 2018.

  1. RonC

    RonC Member

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    My G. pulchripes burrowed about 3 weeks ago and sealed off the entrance to it's hide after eating a couple of meals. It's burrow is at least a third the size of the enclosure. Abdomen was plump and I can't get a good look into the burrow to see if it is molting. I know they like dry substrate but overflow the dish a little to keep some moisture in at least some of the substrate. It's far from being wet. My thinking is a few drops of condensation can form on the side of the enclosure inside the burrow for T. Should I try feeding it since there it won't come out and no prey could find it's way in? Maybe pre-kill a meal worm or cricket and leave it to see if it's coming out at night? Yes I'm a worried newbie.
    Good news is the new G. pulchra came out of it's burrow and likes to hide under a bit of moss next to the hide. It ate a small cricket today so I'm happy about that.
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  2. Tortoise Tom

    Tortoise Tom Well-Known Member

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    I'd leave a pre-killed cricket in there and take a picture of it. Then check back in the morning to see if it is moved or eaten. Three weeks should be enough time for pre-molt, molt, and recovery for a sling.
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  3. Enn49

    Enn49 Moderator Staff Member Premium Member 3 Year Member 1,000+ Post Club

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    I have an S. raja that came to me 2 years ago next month and I've seen it 3 times, each time during rehousing. There is no sign of a burrow either on the surface or at the sides of the container. The only clues I have that it is alive are food disappearing overnight and occasional humps appearing on the surface of the substrate which I presume is the result of the T moulting and enlarging its home. I have given up worrying about it.
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  4. RonC

    RonC Member

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    I left a pre-killed meal worm and it was still there 24 hrs later. Try again in a few days. I can see well enough to know it's moving around in the burrow. I knew this was a possibility. And I found the cricket I thought the new G pulchra ate and removed it. It happily took a pre-killed meal worm though. Maybe I'll try a p-k cricket and see.this weekend.
  5. Greg

    Greg New Member

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    I got my G.pulchripes sling in March. It has spent 2/3 of its time underground. This is the normal behavior of a small vulnerable terrestrial T to protect itself. Crickets I place on the surface are usually gone by the next day; it will come out at night to catch them. Burrowing also seems related to ambient temperature; it was more active during the summer, and it along with my A.geniculata have bunkered in for the winter.