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brachypelma hamorii sling is not moving for hours

ilovebrachys

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my sling hamorii is attached to the enclosure's wall for hours and not moving i need help
is there something to worry about?View attachment 46517
I can't see any hide in there? And your substrate looks quite damp?
Sometimes Ts don't like it if it's too damp for them and will climb - they don't like feeling exposed either...
You can use a small piece of bark for a hide also make sure your sling has a water dish.. A bottle cap will do :)
 

raijinnnneq

New Member
I can't see any hide in there? And your substrate looks quite damp?
Sometimes Ts don't like it if it's too damp for them and will climb - they don't like feeling exposed either...
You can use a small piece of bark for a hide also make sure your sling has a water dish.. A bottle cap will do :)
i use coco peat and i mist it on one side is that okay?
 

ilovebrachys

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i use coco peat and i mist it on one side is that okay?
Coco peat is fine but don't mist.. Brachypelma don't like damp so just provide a bottle cap filled with water for it to drink from and give it something to hide under and I'm sure you will have a happy sling :)
 

octanejunkie

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3 Year Member
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How about a side view pic of the enclosure? We may have more advice for you...

I suspect you could use more substrate and this could work to your immediate advantage now with that moist layer underneath and drier substrate on top
 

testdasi

Member
i have no coco peat left. :(( is it okay if i leave it like that for the weekend?
It probably will be fine.
Hard to tell from the pic but I'm guesstimating that from the top of the substrate to the top of the tank is still less than 2x the diagonal legspan of the T, which should be fine.
Even if it's more than that, it's a RISK of the T climbing too high and falling and NOT a guarantee something bad would happen so don't worry too much.

Tarantulas are a lot hardier than you might think.
All these "do this" and "don't do that" is more to create as ideal an environment as possible for the T. Divergence from the presumably best practice isn't quite a death sentence as it may sound.

Even the presumably best practice can be debatable e.g. there was a recent hotly-worded debate over how to keep GBB slings on the other T forum.
 

octanejunkie

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3 Year Member
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Keep in mind, terrestrial Ts are used to living on the ground, solid ground. If your substrate is fluffy and not packed down they won't like it. That may be why it's on the wall. While it is there, measure the DLS (diagonal leg span) of the T. Write down that number.

Get a bag of coco fiber, get a bag of peat. Mix them together 50/50. Put your T in a catch cup with a lid.

Pack down the substrate in the enclosure now. Add more and pack that down too. Repeat the process until you get the desired depth, no more vertical free space than 1.5-2x the DLS you measured before.
Add a water dish and a hide. A pice of cork bark, a bottle cap, whatever. Make a starter burrow with your finger, or two right in front of the hide.

Enjoy your T enjoying it's enclosure and you and it will both be stress free.
 

m0lsx

Well-Known Member
Tarantula Club Member
I rehoused one of my juvenile T's a few days ago & it was up on the side of its enclosure for the next day or so. It is not unusual behaviour after rehousing, even if the top layer of substrate is dry. But as said some bark as cover & in the short term, for something to stand on above the substrate is needed. Although with small slings, I personally prefer to add a couple of plastic leaves, as they give cover without the need to dig under it.
 

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