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Anybody with pacman frog experience? I have a problem

Discussion in 'Vertebrate Pet Talk' started by Allthingsterrarium, Oct 22, 2017.

  1. Allthingsterrarium

    Allthingsterrarium Active Member 3 Year Member

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    Hey everybody! If anybody here has a pacman frog or has kept them and has had similiar problems I would love to get your input on something. I am also a member of a website called frogforum.com which is an awesome site and I'm going to ask there too but it seems to have a few bugs as of late and not as many people on it as there used to be so if I can get a few more opinions here I would very much appreciate that. I've had my pacman frog Button since November of 2014 and I'm not sure how old he was when I got him but probably not very. He's a chacoan/cranwell's horned frog or ceratophrys cranwelli and about the size of a baseball if that helps at all. I'm not that worried yet but I am becoming very concerned. Sure pacmans can go a very long time without eating, especially when they sometimes start brumating when it gets cooler which I originally thought was the problem because he was at room temperature at 73 degrees and I got him a better heating pad not too long ago but he has barely eaten all summer and is still refusing food which is getting alarming really quick. I'd say he's outgrown crickets but will still take them sometimes. Otherwise he eats nightcrawlers, roaches, canned grasshoppers and occasionally thawed mice. He usually reacts to movement pretty well and doesn't usually mind forceps and even when he doesn't you might be able to force him to open his mouth but even that's not working. With the heating pad and space heater on now, the tank is usually about 80-85 degrees and at least 73 degrees at night yet he still refuses food even though he seems to be getting more active. In our house we keep the air conditioning on when it's warm and I have the space heater on in winter, usually in addition to central heating so to him summer is probably more like winter and winter more like summer. He's still looking pretty good and hasn't lost too much weight but I still wish I could find out what's wrong. I wish someone would at least look at him but it seems like most veterinarians won't do their job and see anything other than dogs and cats. I've seen terrarium animals refuse food until they starved despite everything before and I don't want to watch that happen again. I don't know though, maybe it's just his time, pacmans can live up to 15 years but sometimes as few as 5 years and I still don't know exactly how old he was when I got him. Again, he hasn't lost too much weight but he's had probably two large meals in 5 months and to me that's unacceptable even for an animal that can slow it's metabolism down considerably for months on end. Here's a picture of him I took a little while ago.

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    Dave Jay likes this.
  2. Tortoise Tom

    Tortoise Tom Well-Known Member

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    Did you ever get an answer or figure out the problem? Sorry I'm so late to your thread, but I'd love to know what happened.
    Dave Jay likes this.
  3. Allthingsterrarium

    Allthingsterrarium Active Member 3 Year Member

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    No problem at all! He's actually remained pretty hardy. I've gotten him to eat off and on several times since posting. He's still incredibly stubborn but at least he's eating regularly enough to ease my mind. Sometimes he has more of an appetite than other times. I find trying additional measures for warmth, changing his substrate every 2 months, giving him baths, taking him out and stimulating his activity and trying to offer food when he's more perky all seem to help. He's still an adult though. He doesn't need to eat nearly as often as a juvenile and this is an animal species used to having excessive fasting periods.
    Dave Jay and Tortoise Tom like this.