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A Simple Feeder Set Up

Discussion in 'Tarantula Feeding and Feeder Insects' started by Dave Jay, Feb 24, 2018.

  1. Dave Jay

    Dave Jay Well-Known Member

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    In my experience this is a simple set up that works for breeding mealworms and roaches, and for keeping and growing crickets.
    If you have other methods or tweeks on this method please add them to the thread.

    Obtain a Critter Keeper or similar, or a tub with a lot of ventilation.
    Pour in a packet of rolled oats, quick cooking or regular, or both. Use enough to make a layer 2.5 to 5cm (1 to 2").
    Add the cut up bottoms of egg cartons covering the oats but leaving a gap at one end or a side.
    Cover the egg carton pieces with pieces of cardboard. I like to put holes in the cardboard pieces.
    Add more pieces of egg carton bottom.
    Add more cardboard pieces on top of the new egg carton .
    You can continue to stack until you run out of room, but two layers are adequate.
    Add your insects .
    Add food directly onto the oats where you left a gap. Carrot is a staple food for most feeders, but most vegetable scraps can be fed.

    If you are housing roaches...
    Cut the legs off of a clean pair of pantyhose and stretch it over the top of the container, gather the stumps of the cut off legs, twist together and put a rubber band on it. This is where you can add food etc without having roaches escape over the sides.

    You can add a small water dish if you think you need one, although feeding fresh vegetables every few days is enough moisture for most insects. I have used a small lid with sphagnum moss in it, and I admit the roaches did seem attracted to it when freshened, but they breed fine without it too.
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  2. siuoll

    siuoll Member

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    can please send a picture of what you did?
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  3. Dave Jay

    Dave Jay Well-Known Member

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    Yes, I have photos for a step by step tutorial because I had it on my website, but my website is down atm so I have to find the originals on my computer from 3 or 4 years ago and haven't got to finding them yet, but I can take pictures of the ones I've had set up for ages, I will post some as soon as possible.
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  4. Mvtt70

    Mvtt70 Active Member

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    I'd like to see it too if possible I'd appreciate it. I saw this thread a while ago and got a little confused when I tried to follow it to be completely honest.
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  5. Dave Jay

    Dave Jay Well-Known Member

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    I'm a bit busy atm, it's a quarter past 5 and I'm getting dinner cooking, but I took some pictures with my phone for now and I'll find the others, or clean one of the colonies out and take pictures with the camera as I set it back up. So here is the critter keeper with a layer of oats, both rolled and quick cooking. Then egg carton is put on top of the oats leaving a gap at one end.
    20180325_170522.jpg
    Cardboard with holes poked in it is put onto the egg carton. Then you repeat the layers, ending with a layer of cardboard. 20180325_170642.jpg 20180325_170833.jpg I then put brown paper bags on top. Most times there are enough mealworms in the bags, or on the cardboard and I don't need to go any lower to find enough worms. This works to keep crickets till they die of old age, and for keeping or breeding roaches. I don't use the bags with crickets and roaches though.

    Attached Files:

  6. Dave Jay

    Dave Jay Well-Known Member

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    For roaches I use clean pantyhose, I usually buy them new and get a large size, and stretch the waistband over the top of the enclosure. I then hold the legs up and cut them off making a hole in the middle . 20180325_170944.jpg 20180325_170956.jpg 20180325_171023.jpg Then I twist the hole closed and secure it with a rubber band. I still put the lid on over the pantyhose as protection from the outside, and as a double layer from the inside, sometimes there are holes and I'll find big roaches under this. The penalty for trying to escape is death by cichlid! 20180325_170907.jpg
    I also use the pantyhose with crickets if they're small, but if they can get to the top they will chew through the pantyhose now and then.
  7. Mvtt70

    Mvtt70 Active Member

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    I'm using plastic Kritter Keepers for my crickets, is there a reason people use glass instead?
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  8. Dave Jay

    Dave Jay Well-Known Member

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    The ones in my pictures are cheap plastic KK copies. There's no reason not to use glass if you have a mesh lid, but crickets chew all the silicone away and can climb the corners easily.
  9. Dave Jay

    Dave Jay Well-Known Member

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    The plastic ones are better imo as there's still plenty of ventilation when stacked. 15219666190191251574287.jpg
  10. Mvtt70

    Mvtt70 Active Member

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    I think I have those exact KK's actually lol.
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  11. Dave Jay

    Dave Jay Well-Known Member

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    Time lapse of mealworms eating and burying chunks of carrot, 4 photos each of 2 enclosures over 5 hours.
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    2 4.JPG
    The carrot will still be under the frass, later all that will be found is dried husks if anything at all.